COMMUNITIES WE SERVE

Town of Barre

The population was 5,398 at the 2010 census.

Total area of 44.6 square miles 

Originally called the Northwest District of Rutland, it was first settled in 1720. The town was incorporated as a district on June 17, 1774, as Hutchinson after Thomas Hutchinson, colonial governor of Massachusetts. Eventually along with 41 other districts in the state, they were all incorporated on August 23, 1775 by the Massachusetts Court. The next year on November 7, 1776, it was renamed Barre in honor of Colonel Isaac Barré, an Irish-born MP who was a champion of American Independence. Starting in the 1800s, the Boston, Barre and Gardner Railroad provided rail service to the town.

Town of Rutland

The population was 7,973 at the 2010 census.

Total area of 36.4 square miles 

The town was first settled in 1666 as Naquag. Officially incorporated in 1713, the Town of Rutland was made up of BarreHubbardstonOakhamPrinceton, and the northern half of Paxton. In Northern Rutland there are prison camps used during the Revolutionary War used for captured Hessian mercenaries hired by the British.

Town of Hubbardston

Hubbardston, the "Northeast Quarter" of Rutland, was incorporated as a separate district in 1767 and named for Thomas Hubbard (1702-1773), Commissary General of the Province of Massachusetts and Treasurer of Harvard College.[2] It is reported in local history that in view of the honor of giving his name to the town, Hubbard promised to provide the glass for the windows of the first meeting house built in town. To make his liberality more conspicuous, the people planned for extra windows, but when Hubbard died in 1773, his estate was so complicated that the town of Hubbardston received nothing and was obliged to glaze the windows at its own expense.[3]

In 1737 Eleazer Brown located on a farm of 60 acres given him by the proprietors of Rutland on the condition he operate a public house or inn.[4] Until 1746, Brown and his wife were the only inhabitants of Hubbardston. After Eleazer's death (reportedly killed by a deer), Mrs. Brown was then the only occupant of town for several years, and she kept the public house for prominent travelers. In 1749, Israel Green moved into Hubbardston. His daughter, Molly Green, is reported to be the first child born in Hubbardston. Mr. Green was the first chairman of the board of selectmen.[citation needed]

The town's early economy was based on agriculture and small-scale chair, boot, and shoe manufacturing. It is described by historians as a poor town, sparsely settled and almost wholly agricultural, but having sawmills, potash works, and cottage industries such as the making of palm-leaf hats. By the 19th century, dairy and berry farming and market gardening were major pursuits in the town. Immigrants from Ireland, French Canada, England, Sweden, and Finland moved to town to work on local farms

The population was 4,382 at the 2010 census.

Total area of 42.0 square miles

Total Towns Served:  5

Total 911 Calls:   

Total CAD CAlls: 60,826  (2018)

Total Population served:  24,790

Total Square Miles Covered: 172.1

Total Dispatchers: 10 FT & 4 PT

Town of Oakham

The population was 1,902 at the 2010 census.

Total area of 21.5 square miles

Oakham was first settled by British colonists in 1749 as part of Rutland, and was officially incorporated in 1762. It was originally named Oakhampton, but the name was changed for an unknown reason.

The village of Coldbrook Springs is part of Oakham, near the Barre line.

Town of Warren

The population was 5,135 at the 2010 census.

Total area of 27.6 square miles 

Warren was first settled in 1664 and was officially incorporated on January 16, 1741 as the town of Western.[1]

Originally a part of Quaboag Plantation, the town now known as Warren was part of Brookfield for 68 years until it was renamed Western. Warren includes land petitioned from both the Quaboag Plantation and the "Kingsfield", which included parts of Palmer and Brimfield.[1]

On March 13, 1834, the town was renamed Warren in honor of General Joseph Warren, who died at the Battle of Bunker Hill during the American Revolutionary War. The need to rename the town came about due to confusion of the name "Western" with the town of Weston, Massachusetts. According to the History of Warren Massachusetts by Olney I. Darling, Western was renamed Warren due to "countless mistakes in the transmission of the mails."[2] On January 13, 1834, a town meeting was held to discuss a name change. Shortly thereafter, the town petitioned the legislature to change the name, which was soon done, and the first town meeting under the name "Warren" was held on April 28, 1834.

Warren in Worcester County historically contained the villages of #4 Village, Center Village, West Warren, Lower Village, and South Warren. Historical markers mark each of these areas, and West Warren and Warren each have their own zip codes.

Non-Emergency Line -

508-886-4033

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508-886-4125

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